Giving back: Tweed Valley Mountain Rescue Team

One of the core principles behind our approach to business since launching in Autumn 2020 is that our products should return value and benefit to the community where we are based, with the aim of increasing the scope and nature of that support as we grow.

Tweed Valley Mountain Rescue Team

To that end, we are really pleased that Tweed Valley Mountain Rescue Team (Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TVMRT/, Instagram: @tweedvalleymrt) have agreed to partner with us in a charitable donation agreement.

Who are the Tweed Valley Mountain Rescue Team?

This is how they describe themselves, and their activities - you can find out even more about them on their website:

"Tweed Valley Mountain Rescue Team is based in the Scottish Borders. It is part of the network of Mountain Rescue Teams affiliated to Scottish Mountain Rescue which covers the whole of the country.

The team is a charity and all the members are volunteers who are on call 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to go to the assistance of people (and occasionally animals) who are lost, missing or injured.

The team has its base in Selkirk and covers West Lothian, Mid Lothian, City of Edinburgh and the Scottish Borders west of the A68."

How will Tweed Valley Distilling Co. support TVMRT in their work?

Simple: with every bottle of 70cl and 50cl bottles sold by us on a face-to-face basis - at the likes of local markets, farmers markets, trade fairs, or any other outdoor event - the Tweed Valley Mountain Rescue Team will benefit from a charitable donation of £3 per 70cl bottle / £2 per 50cl bottle. We'll make those donations after each individual event to make sure that the funds are received by TVMRT as soon as possible. This arrangement will be in place until April 2021, and we expect to be able to continue that support beyond.

The benefits of (even small, incremental) donations to TVMRT can be significant - their operations cost circa £30k per year, which is self-funded through charitable fundraising, with only limited financial support from the Scottish Government. To give you a sense of the extent of work they do, between 2006 – 2016 they spent on average 1380 hours per year carrying out Search & Rescue based activities plus 3000 hours of training as a team.